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abstracts:lymer_id60 [2015/12/18 08:54]
christian.heine
abstracts:lymer_id60 [2015/12/18 08:54] (current)
christian.heine
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 |:::        | <​nowiki>​D. Sawyer</​nowiki>​ | <​nowiki>​Department of Earth Science, University of Rice, Texas</​nowiki>​ | |:::        | <​nowiki>​D. Sawyer</​nowiki>​ | <​nowiki>​Department of Earth Science, University of Rice, Texas</​nowiki>​ |
 |:::        | <​nowiki>​the Galicia 3D working group</​nowiki>​ | <​nowiki>​Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory,​ Columbia University, New York/​Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain</​nowiki>​ | |:::        | <​nowiki>​the Galicia 3D working group</​nowiki>​ | <​nowiki>​Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory,​ Columbia University, New York/​Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain</​nowiki>​ |
-|:::        | <​nowiki>​the Galicia 3D working group</​nowiki>​ | <​nowiki>​Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory,​ Columbia University, New York/​Institute of Marine Sciences, Barcelona, Spain</​nowiki>​ | 
-|:::        | <​nowiki>​ </​nowiki>​ | <​nowiki>​ </​nowiki>​ | 
  
 The west Galicia margin (western Spain) represents an ideal location to study the processes of continental extension and break-up. The margin is characterised by hyper-extended continental crust, thinning to less than 3 km, well defined rotated faults blocks with associated syn-kinematic sedimentary wedges, and exhumed serpentinized continental mantle. Faulted blocks are located above a strong reflector, the S reflector, generally interpreted as both a detachment and the crust-mantle boundary. In addition, the structures of the margin are well observed from seismic data due to limited post-rift sedimentary cover and poor volcanic activity. ​ The west Galicia margin (western Spain) represents an ideal location to study the processes of continental extension and break-up. The margin is characterised by hyper-extended continental crust, thinning to less than 3 km, well defined rotated faults blocks with associated syn-kinematic sedimentary wedges, and exhumed serpentinized continental mantle. Faulted blocks are located above a strong reflector, the S reflector, generally interpreted as both a detachment and the crust-mantle boundary. In addition, the structures of the margin are well observed from seismic data due to limited post-rift sedimentary cover and poor volcanic activity. ​